Childbirth, Pregnancy, Press

A New Perspective On Self-Care {book excerpt}

Exercise does not have to be held together by laces, sweat-wicking spandex, and a Jillian Michaels playlist you found in a fitness magazine. Toning and stretching your muscles and livening up your heart rate can happen anyplace, anytime. Of the suggestions below, some are a few of the endorphin-eliciting quickies I partook in while my uterus was packing a baby, and some are ideas from the human-making babes I’ve worked with. I encourage you to try these, then work out your creative nature by thinking up new ways to get in a quickie.

  • Squats: While you’re doing dishes, scrolling through your phone, or engaging in any other stationary activity, squat into it. A squat is an excellent way to prep your birthing muscles and get comfortable assuming the most effective birthing position, which is . . . a squat. Play around with the squat until you find a position that you feel secure in while it’s causing your glutes and thighs to tighten. No need to assume a full squat; bending your knees a bit and lowering your tush a few inches is effective. Squat for as long as you feel comfortable, and upgrade the benefits by dropping some Kegels into the mix.

Read more on SarahMaclaughlin.com

Childbirth, Mom Humor, Parenting, Pregnancy, Press

Fun Interview on What Matters Most with Paul Dolman!

“What a joy to interact with Bailey Gaddis (find her on Twitter!), a dynamic and inspiring woman who is clearly on a mission to brighter the world with the vast knowledge she has acquired through her many experiences.”

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Airplane Travel, Parenting, Travel

Mom Bloggers Share the 18 Things That Are Lifesavers While Traveling with Kids

*Reader’s Digest family travel article, by Lisa Marie Conklin, I contributed three tips to.

Sing a soothing song

Even if you can’t carry a tune, your kids can be lulled into quiet time or sleep with a song. “A week before you leave on your trip, choose a soothing song to sing to your child every night at bedtime that they associate with calming down,” suggests Bailey Gaddis, author of Feng Shui Mommy. This go-to methods helps mom and kid settle down after a weary day of traveling. If you have a fidgeter, Gaddis suggests telling your child to close their eyes, watch your face or have them focus on a calming object so they don’t get distracted.

Scavenger hunt

Sightseeing can become boring for kids which usually leads to meltdowns. Gaddis gives her son a scavenger hunt to keep him engaged. “I make a list beforehand of common plants, animals, structures, or objects we’re likely to come across as we sight see. I then read him the list on the way to get him excited about the activity,” says Gaddis. If the kids run through the list before you’re done sightseeing, just add more on the fly.

Meditation

Gaddis spends a few minutes every morning meditating on how she would like the trip to play out and attaches those positive emotions to positive outcomes. “This will send you into your trip exuding a positive attitude that will be absorbed by your children,” says Gaddis. While traveling, Gaddis meditates with her son each morning. They close their eyes and visualize how they want the day to go. They share what they visualized, including the emotions, challenges, strengths and family bonding. “My son tells me what flavors of ice cream we’ll eat at the end of day!” To further appreciate the travel experience the pair often meditates during the day. “We also have meditation moments throughout the day, where we take a moment to really take in how beautiful a flower is, how interesting a piece of tree bark is, what our hand feels like in a cool creek or ocean, and anything else that helps up slow down and be present in our vacation,” says Gaddis. “I’ve noticed that this also helps prevent us from feeling like our vacation flew by—in a good way!”

Read more on Reader’s Digest!

Childbirth, Parenting, Pregnancy, Press, Self Love

Interview on Moments with Marianne Tomorrow!

Hi friends! Tune in to my interview with Marianne Pestana on her radio show tomorrow – info is below 🙂

Click here to listen LIVE on Friday, June 9th & Thursday, June 15th at 5am & 5pm EST!
http://rdo.to/DREAM7

Childbirth, Pregnancy

7 People You MUST Avoid When Pregnant

Some people can really suck when you’re having a baby.

With the great strength birthed when you become pregnant, comes a great vulnerability. This vulnerability is a gift in many ways, expanding your ability to feel love so profoundly it shakes your core, making it a joy versus a struggle to make sacrifices in the name of another person, and developing a heightened sensitivity for the world and people around you (and bigger boobs and fuller hair).

This vulnerability also makes you, well… more vulnerable. The words, actions, and emotions of others will have a deeper impact on how you interact with yourself and surroundings, and how you navigate your pregnancy and birth.

To ensure your journey into motherhood is filled with people who honor and nurture your vulnerability, instead of taking advantage of it, here are 7 people to avoid when pregnant.

Read more on YourTango

Childbirth, Mind-Body-Spirit, Parenting, Pregnancy, Self Love

How To Dissolve Your Fears Through Acceptance [Step-by-Step Exercises + Action Steps To Overcome Your Fears During Pregnancy]

Fear can be a catalyst for growth only when it is acknowledged and accepted, then shown the door.

When it becomes a festering guest it begins swallowing up your reserves of health, happiness, and sanity, sticking you in a “what-if” paralysis. The oftentimes-falseillusions that give birth to fear (e.g., a misconception that your body doesn’t know how to build and birth a baby) are frequently left unchecked in the vulnerable heart, mind, and body of the pregnant mama.

You may believe the fears are there to protect you, maybe to “prepare you for the worst.”

But instead of helping you prepare for an unlikely and unwanted outcome, the stress produced by these fears often creates the unwanted outcomes, like pregnancy complications, medical interventions, or postpartum depression.

Read more on Learn Evolve and Thrive